Tuesday, March 17, 2020

A Month Before Cop Murder, D.A. Twice Let Drug Dealer Out Of Jail

Photo credit: Tim Tai/The Philadelphia Inquirer
By Ralph Cipriano
for BigTrial.net

The month before 19-year-old  Bilal Mitchell was holed up with Hassan Elliott in a Frankford row house that got stormed by a SWAT team -- resulting in the murder of Corporal James O'Connor -- the cops arrested Mitchell twice for drug dealing.

When he got arrested as an adult in February, Mitchell had three open juvenile cases and one previous arrest as an adult. For exactly a year, since Feb. 6, 2019, Mitchell had been placed on a GPS monitor, a monitor he was supposed to be wearing when he was arrested as an adult for both drug crimes last month.

But at any point during this one-man crime spree, did the District Attorney's office under Larry Krasner go back to juvenile court and ask that Mitchell be put in detention? No way. After his first drug arrest as an adult, on Aug. 8, 2019, for manufacture with intent to distribute, Mitchell was released on his own recognizance, no bail required.

On one of those adult drug pinches last month, Mitchell was also charged for carrying guns. But twice last month, thanks to amazingly low bail set by the district attorney's office, Mitchell was able to walk out of jail without sustaining much of a dent to his wallet.

The first time, on Feb. 7th, he plunked down 10 percent, or just $2,510 on $25,000 bail; the second time, on Feb. 20, it only cost Mitchell $2,010 on $20,000 bail.

A seasoned former prosecutor who reviewed Mitchell's record described him as a "one-man crime wave that cannot be supervised. He's a major drug dealer, a danger to the community, and a flight risk" because of two different bench warrants issued back when Mitchell was a juvenile. The prosecutor described the low bail set by the D.A.'s office as "nothing to a drug dealer."

But instead of asking for higher bail, the D.A. made it easy for Mitchell to resume his criminal activities. The D.A. also could have ordered what's known as a Nebbia hearing, where the person posting bail is required to disclose the source of the funds.

But on the Municipal Court docket, under the heading "Nebbia Status," it says "None."

Instead, Mitchell went through the turnstiles of D.A. Larry Krasner's revolving door justice system that puts dangerous criminals on the streets again ASAP. 

So the next time the cops ran into him, Mitchell was behind a locked door in Frankford with his pal Elliott when a dozen shots rang out, one of which killed Cpl. O'Connor.

During his juvenile career, Mitchell was the subject of two bench warrants, issued in 2018 and 2019. On three occasions during his underage career as a criminal, he was found to be an "adjudicated delinquent," the juvenile equivalent of being found guilty.

The first time, on Nov. 27, 2019, Mitchell was found to be an adjudicated delinquent on a charge of manufacture, delivery or possession with intent to manufacture or deliver. Two other charges stemming from a Dec. 22, 2017 arrest were dropped, including intentional possession of a controlled substance, and possession of marijuana.

During that same court appearance in juvenile court on Nov. 27, 2019, Mitchell was found to be an adjudicated delinquent on a charge of unauthorized use of motor vehicles stemming from the same Dec. 22, 2017 arrest. A charge of receiving stolen property was dropped.

Finally, on Nov. 27, 2019, Mitchell was found to be an found to be an adjudicated delinquent on a charge of manufacture, delivery or possession with intent to manufacture or deliver, a charge stemming from a Feb. 14, 2018 arrest. A charge of intentional possession of a controlled substance was dropped.

During his criminal career as a juvenile, Mitchell was placed on a GPS monitor on Feb. 6, 2019. But on May 10, 2019, according to court records, a bench warrant was issued for Mitchell, indicating he may have cut off his monitor.

On Aug. 8, 2019, Mitchell was arrested as an adult for manufacture, delivery or possession with intent to manufacture or deliver; conspiracy; and intentional possession of a controlled substance. Despite his previous record, Mitchell was released on his own recognizance, and didn't have to post bail.

On Feb. 6th of this year, Mitchell was arrested and hit with a half dozen charges, including: manufacture, delivery or possession with intent to manufacture or deliver; conspiracy; firearms carried without a license; intentional possession of a controlled substance; possession of a firearm; and possession of an instrument of crime.

On Feb. 19th, Mitchell was arrested again on three charges: manufacture, delivery or possession with intent to manufacture or deliver; conspiracy; and intentional possession of a controlled substance.

On March 12th, the day before the shoot-out in Frankford that resulted in the murder of Corporal O'Connor, Mitchell was due in court to face drug charges but the D.A.'s office had to ask for a continuance because a police officer who was a witness in the case was unavailable.

The prosecutor on March 12th assigned to the case was Assistant District Attorney Jonathan Eubank, who joined the D.A.'s office in September of 2019. 

These are the rookie prosecutors who Krasner has hired to carry out his revolution in criminal justice. A revolution that doesn't believe in putting criminals in jail, or setting high bail.

Everybody in the city is in a panic at the moment because of the coronavirus. But a far more deadly danger to the public health of the citizens is posed by the incumbent district attorney of Philadelphia. 

On Facebook, a smiling D.A. Krasner tells the public in masterful Orwellian speak that he "fights for equal justice for the great people of Philadelphia." And that "A fair and effective criminal justice system makes us safer."

But the facts are that Krasner's revolution has only resulted in a violent crime wave that has negatively impacted the safety of every neighborhood in the city.

A hero cop named Jimmy O'Connor was only the most recent casualty of Krasner's disastrous policies.

How many more victims will there have to be before we get rid of Krasner?

2 comments:

  1. Ralph. Here is the latest on how Krasner doesn't give a rats ads about law enforcement. Despite the DA Office being closed for 2 weeks as well as the courts. Chief County Detective Kenyatta Lee ordered all law enforcement to report to work anyway. But here is the kicker in the inquirer on March 15 indicated a few employees are self quarantined and a lawyer fell sick and another employee showed symptoms. Yet the office never notified staff etc. The found out about it in the paper. So now all law enforcement that pass thru that office etc are at risk!!!

    ReplyDelete
  2. ESSENTIAL is the word. The FOP just put out something. Let's see if Team Krasner/Lee are going to try to say DA Law Enforcement is now not needed and non-essential to not pay them OT!! 2 days you are and now all of a sudden you are not??????

    ReplyDelete

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